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General instructions

General Directions  


A-Nail Requirements
B-Cement
C-Protective Tape
D-Application on mansard and steep slope roofs
E-High Wind Warranty Installation
F-Cold Weather Application
G-Installing Over Existing Layer of Shingles
H-Ventilation

 


 

A-Nail Requirements :

Use 10 to 12 gauge galvanized nails with a minimum 9 mm (3/8”) head for all types of shingles. Nails must be long enough to penetrate a minimum of 19 mm (3/4”) into solid wood deck or just through the plywood deck. Do not use staples to fasten shingles. Raised nails can result in shingle distortion and may prevent sealing. Drive nails until they are flush with the surface; do not overdrive nails. Do not nail in the adhesive strip: this may prevent shingles from sticking together (see Figure 3).

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B-Cement

Use an Asphalt Plastic Cement which conforms to CAN/CGSB 37.5-M89 and/or ASTM D-4586 Type Ito ensure compatibility. Cement must be applied only with a comb or notched trowel in a thin (less than 2 mm or 1/16” thick) even coating. Overuse of cement can damage the shingles.

IMPORTANT : Shingles have a factory applied adhesive that is activated thermally. Certain conditions will hinder the effectiveness by which the adhesive keeps the shingle tabs down to prevent wind blow-offs.

SEAL DOWN SHINGLE TABS IF SHINGLES ARE INSTALLED :

• In high wind areas;
• On a steep sloped and mansard roof 15/12. Please refer to the High Wind Warranty Installation and see Figure 4 ;
• At a temperature that will not activate the self-seal adhesive, BP recommends that hand sealing should be done from September 21st to March 21st. Please refer to
• In areas subject to high dust conditions.

After nailing, seal shingle tabs. Seal by applying a dab of Asphalt Plastic Cement no larger than the size and thickness of a 25 ¢ – or a 1.6 cm (5/8”) bead, 2 mm (1/16”) thick at each bottom corner of every tab on all shingles so that the lower edge of the dab is at least 2.5 cm (1’’)above the bottom of the overlying shingle. All  shingles must be pressed firmly into the cement. Do not use excessive cement.

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C-Protective Tape

Do not remove parting strip of protective tape from the shingle underside. Its purpose is to prevent the shingles from sticking together while in the bundle. It does not affect the application or the effectiveness of the product.
 

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D-Application on mansard and steep slope roofsProper nailing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The maximum slope considered suitable for normal shingle application is 15/12. Use six (6) nails per shingle instead of four. Place one nail 2.5 cm (1”) back from each end, one nail 27 cm (10 1/2”) back from each end and one 34 cm (13 1/2”) back from each end for a total of six nails. After nailing, apply a small spot of Asphalt Plastic Cement, larger than the size and thickness of a 25¢ - or a 16 mm (5/8”) bead, 1.5 mm (1/16”) thick - under the bottom corners of each tab so that the lower edge of the dab is at least 2.5cm (1”) above the bottom of the overlying tab. Excess application of Asphalt Plastic Cement can cause blistering. Cement location is 2.5 cm (1”) and 30 cm (12”) in from each end for a total of four dabs for laminate shingles and six dabs for 3-tab shingles. Shingles must be pressed firmly into cement (see Figure 4 and 5). 

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E-High Wind Warranty Installation

To qualify for High Wind Warranty, which warrants against wind damage or shingle displacement for winds between 130 km/h (80 mph) and 220 km/h (135 mph), shingles must be fastened using 6 nails and all shingles located at the roof edges must be cement together in a 10 cm (4”) wide layer of plastic cement. If above special application instructions are not followed, shingles will be warranted for winds from 115 km/h (70 mph) to 180 km/h (110 mph). See Table 1 for High Wind Warranty wind speed for the shingle being installed.  

    
 
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F-Cold Weather Application

Shingles have a factory applied adhesive which is thermally activated. The self-seal adhesive must be subjected to sufficient heat to activate the bond. When the shingles are installed in environmental conditions that will not produce such temperature or in very windy areas, the shingles should be sealed down with spots of Asphalt Plastic Cement under each tab as specified in CSA A123.51-M85. BP recommends that hand sealing should be done from September 21st to March 21st. Please refer to the Cement section and Figure 4 for proper cementing method.

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G-Installing Over Existing Layer of Shingles :

Old roof must be dry and provide smooth surface. Replace all damaged, curled, broken, buckled or loose shingles. To ensure a smooth even surface, sweep the old roofing prior to the installation. Fasteners must be of sufficient length to penetrate deep enough in the wood deck. Apply new shingles using butt-edge (nesting) application method where the top of the new shingle is nested against the bottom of the exposed portion of the old roofing shingle.

Multiple layers installation must be done in accordance with local bylaws and building code requirements ; load restrictions must be considered when applying more than one layer of roofing material. When trying to decide whether you should apply asphalt shingles over old shingles, use the following checklist to ensure you meet the requirements for multiple layer installation:

• Make sure the deck can support an additional layer of shingles. The question of weight is more critical if the original roof deck is thinner than the standards recommended in the current building code or if it is unsound in any way. Some local ordinances forbid reroofing over two or more layers of shingles because of the danger of overloading the supporting structure. Check your local building code;

• Verify the underside of the deck. Boards that are warped or rotten must be replaced and those boards that are loose must be properly nailed. Decks that are warped or otherwise unsound preclude multiple layer installation and should be replaced;

• Check that the old roof system does not have moisture retention problems and will meet minimum ventilation requirements, once an additional layer of shingles has been installed. There may be requirements to increase ventilation of the attic space;

• Check the condition of the old shingles. If the old shingle surface is anything other than smooth and flat, cut and nail down buckles, raised tabs or curled edges. Remove or drive in any protruding nails. Defects in the old layer of shingles may telegraph through the new layer. Building Products of Canada Corp. will not be responsible for appearance problems related to multiple layer installation, such problems being typical of this type of installation;

• Remember if adding a second layer, you will need longer nails to ensure that you nail into the roof deck ;
• The hip & ridge shingles of an existing roof on which new shingles are to be installed must be removed before application of new shingles.

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H-Ventilation

All roof structures must be provided with through ventilation to prevent entrapment of moisture-laden air beneath the deck. Ventilation provisions must meet or exceed current National Building Code requirements. In the U.S.A., check local building codes for minimum requirements. In general, as specified in most building codes, for a low-slope roof or one with cathedral ceilings, every roof space or attic above an insulated ceiling must be ventilated with openings to the exterior to provide an unobstructed vent area of not less than 1/300 ft2 of the total insulated ceiling area. This ratio does not apply for all roofs. A low slope roof or one with cathedral ceilings requires twice (2x) the ventilation or a ratio of 1/150 ft2. The vents used may be roof-type vents, eave-type vents, gable-end type vents or any combination, and should be uniformly distributed to ventilate each roof space. When calculating the net free area (unobstructed open area), be sure to factor in any obstacle to free air circulation such as screens, grids, louvers, blades, etc.

There must be at least 7.6 cm (3”) of space between the insulation in the attic and the deck. If insulation was added to the deck without leaving space for air flow, the ventilated soffit might not be able to do the job it was intended to do.

The shingle warranty will only be valid if all roof structures are provided with proper through ventilation.

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Eave Protection & Underlayment

Eave Protection

Apply a non-corroding metal drip edge at the eaves (click here to refer to the Drip and Rake Edge section). Next, install the eave protector; GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA, starting at the drip edge. Be sure to :

1] Cut GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA into lengths of 3m to 4.5 m (10’ to 15’);

2] Align this material along the edge of the roof and re-roll;

3] Peel back about 30.5 cm (12”) of release film backing and adhere the peeled area. Re-roll to the adhered portion;

4] Pull on the release film backing to unroll GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA and press the material into place to ensure tight bond. If the membrane deviates from the roof line, cut and start as above mentioned procedure;

5] Starting at the low point of the roof, work upward.Apply PROGARD ULTRA by laying the roll horizontally and extending up the roof, from the eaves, to a point at least 30.5 cm (12”) beyond the interior wall line. On low slope roofs 2/12 to 4/12 PROGARD ULTRA must be extended a minimum of 61 cm (24”) beyond the inside surface of the exterior wall. This requirement may vary depending on location. Check your local building code for minimum requirements;

6] End laps must be a minimum of 15.2 cm (6”), side laps a minimum of 7.6 cm (3”) for GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX and a minimum 5.1 cm (2”) for PROGARD ULTRA ;

7] For GRIPGARD, the end laps must be sealed down with a 10 cm (4”) wide, thin and uniform layer of Asphalt Plastic Cement.

Underlayment

Refer to Table 2 for underlayment requirements for BP Shingles. If you want to meet fire-resistant ratings, the use of underlayment is mandatory under shingles.

The purpose of shingles is to shed water as well to protect against rain which can periodically be driven under shingles. Thus, even when an underlayment is optional, its use over entire roof deck is strongly recommended. An underlayment consists of BP’s GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX, PROGARD ULTRA, n°15 CSA Pro Felt, n°15 Asphalt Felt Plain or DECKGARD laid horizontally over the deck and must be applied over the entire roof deck.

The underlayment should be installed over the entire deck surface, with the length perpendicular to the eave. Use BP’s GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX, PROGARD ULTRA, n°15 CSA Pro Felt, n°15 Asphalt Felt Plain or DECKGARD. Overlap horizontally sheets of PROGARD ULTRA on 5cm (2’’), of GRIPGARD and GRIPGARD SX on 7.6cm (3’’), of DECKGARD on 10 cm (4 ’’), of asphalt felts (Plain n°15, n°15 CSA Pro and CSA Classic) on 2‘‘ and 15.2 cm (6”) vertically (see Figure 6).  Nail sufficiently to hold the underlayment in place until the shingles are applied. Install shingles as soon as possible after installation of the underlayment. Building Products of Canada Corp. recommends installing the shingles the same day as the underlayment, to keep it from being wet or wrinkled. If underlayment is used to waterproof over a long period of time, it should be visually inspected to ensure it is not wet, wrinkled or otherwise damaged. If it is, it should be discarded and replaced by a new approved underlayment.

 

Table 2
EAVE PROTECTION
Slope Shingles Minimum Products
1/12 - 4/12
BUR System
• BUR Systems n/a n/a
2/12 - 4-12
Low Slope
• Dakota
• Yukon SB
• Mirage GS
REQUIRED :
24” past inner face
of exterior wall
• Gripgard
• Gripgard SX
• Progard ULTRA
3/12 - 4/12
Low Slope
• Manoir
• Everest
• Mystique
• Harmony
4/12 - 6/12
Standard Slope
All BP
Shingles
REQUIRED :
12” past inner face
of exterior wall
• Gripgard
• Gripgard SX
• Progard ULTRA
• Smooth Surface
6/12 - 8/12
Standard Slope
8/12+
Steep Slope
RECOMMENDED :
12” past inner face
of exterior wall
UNDERLAYMENT
Slope Shingles Minimum Products
1/12 - 4/12
BUR System
• BUR System n/a n/a
2/12 - 4-12
Low Slope
• Dakota
• Yukon SB
• Mirage GS
REQUIRED :
2 Plies n°15 Plain Felt
over entire roof surface
• Gripgard
• Gripgard SX
• Progard ULTRA
• n°15 CSA Pro
• Plain n°15
• Deckgard
3/12 - 4/12
Low Slope
• Manoir
• Everest
• Mystique
• Harmony
4/12 - 6/12
Standard Slope
All BP
Shingles
REQUIRED :
1 Ply n°15 Plain Felt
over entire roof surface

6/12 - 8/12
Standard Slope

RECOMMENDED :
1 Ply n°15 Plain Felt
8/12 + over entire roof surface
8/12+
Steep Slope
DOCUMENTATION
Slope Shingles BP Other
1/12 - 4/12
BUR System
• BUR System

BUR system :
Section [I1]

National Building Code:
Section 9.2

2/12 - 4-12
Low Slope
• Dakota
• Yukon SB
• Mirage GS
Application Instructions :
Sections [R5] 3.2 ;
               [R5] 3.3
National Building Code:
Sections 9.26.5 ;
               9.26.6 ;
               9.26.8
CSA A-123.5M
3/12 - 4/12
Low Slope
• Manoir
• Everest
• Mystique
• Harmony
Application Instructions :
Sections [R5] 3.3 ;
               [R5] 5
4/12 - 6/12
Standard Slope
All BP
Shingles
Application Instructions:
Sections [R5] 3 ;
               [R5] 4 ;
               [R5] 5
National Building Code:
Sections 9.26.5 ;
               9.26.6 ;
               9.26.7
CSA A-123.5M
6/12 - 8/12
Standard Slope
8/12+
Steep Slope


 

Underlayment for Low Slope Shingle Application
Underlayments for Standard Slope Application


Underlayments for Low Slope Shingle Application

The following application instructions must be followed when MIRAGE GS, YUKON SB or DAKOTA are installed on roof slopes between 2/12 to 4 /12 or when MANOIR, EVEREST, HARMONY or MYSTIQUE shingles are installed on roof slopes between 3/12 to 4/ 12. Please refer to the Slope section.

Method 1 :

As described for normal slopes, for optimum protection against water penetration, use a single ply of GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA over the entire wood deck. They are strong, self-adhesive, roofing membranes are applied by peeling off the release / film paper backing as it is unrolled.

Starting at the low point of the roof, apply GRIPGARD or GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA by laying the roll horizontally. End laps must be a minimum of 15cm (6”). Each succeeding course should be lapped over the preceding, lower course of at least 7.6cm (3”) for GRIPGARD and GRIPGARD SX or 5 cm (2’’) for PROGARD ULTRA. Felt underlayment is not required when PROGARD ULTRA, GRIPGARD or GRIPGARD SX is installed over the whole roof.

Method 2 :

Eave protection consists of a single ply of GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA Waterproofing Membrane laid horizontally and extending up the roof, from the eaves to a point at least 61 cm (24”) beyond the interior wall line. End laps must be a minimum of 15 cm (6”). If more than one width is required, overlap the second course 7.6cm (3”) over the first for GRIPGARD and GRIPGARD SX, and 5 cm (2’’) for PROGARD ULTRA (see Figure 7).

Next, install the underlayment. This calls for a double layer of BP’s GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX, PROGARD ULTRA, n°15 CSA Pro Felt, n°15 Asphalt Felt Plain, DECKGARD or other BP roofing asphalt felt underlayment. Lay horizontally over the rest of the roof. Underlayment must be applied over the entire roof deck. Start with a 91 cm (36”) wide sheet overlapping GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA by 43 cm (17”). The first layer should also completely cover the Eave Protection in order to facilitate the application of shingles. Apply a second 91 cm (36”) sheet, overlapping the first one 48 cm (19”), leaving 43 cm (17”) exposed. Thereafter, 91 cm (36”) sheets are laid, each to overlap the upper 48 cm (19”) of the preceding course, until the rest of the roof deck has been covered. Each course of felt is nailed towards its upper edge with only enough nails to hold it in place until the shingles are applied (see Figure 8).

Method 3

This special procedure calls for an eave protection made up of a double layer of BP n°15 Asphalt Felt Plain or BP Standard Asphalt Sheathing which is both cemented and nailed in the eaves and nailed only over the rest of the roof. Start application with a 48 cm (19”) wide starter course of felt, laid along the eaves flush with the edge of the roof. The underlayment must be cemented from the edge of the roof up to a point at least 61 cm (24”) inside the interior wall line. Continue with a full width 91 cm (36”) of felt over the starter course and flush with the edge of the roof, completely covering the 48 cm (19”) starter course. Each course of felt in the eaves is cemented to the preceding course using Asphalt Plastic Cement, applied at the rate of 1 L/m2 (1 gallon / 50 ft2). A 4 kg container of Asphalt Plastic Cement will cover approximately 2.3 m2 (24.5 ft2), 1.5 mm (1/16”) thick. Asphalt Plastic Cement must be applied uniformly with a comb, putty knife or notched trowel so that at no point will dry felt touch dry felt. Special care must be taken to ensure that the proper amount of Asphalt Plastic Cement is applied - refer to the label. The felt is pressed firmly into the cement to ensure proper bonding. Nail sufficiently to hold it in place until the shingles are applied. Continue applying Asphalt Plastic Cement and felt this way up to a point at least 61 cm (24”) inside the interior wall line. Beyond this point 91 cm (36”), sheets are laid, but without Asphalt Plastic Cement, lapping each course 48 cm (19”) over the preceding one. Each course of felt is nailed sufficiently to hold it in place until the shingles are applied (see Figure 9).

 


Underlayments for Standard Slope Application


For slopes of 4/12 or more, best protection consists of one ply of GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA self-sealing membrane laid horizontally from the eaves and extending up the roof to a point at least 30 cm (12”) beyond the interior wall line. End laps must be a minimum of 15 cm (6”). When more than one width is required, overlap the second course 7.6 cm (3”) over the fi rst for GRIPGARD or GRIPGARD SX and 5 cm (2 po) pour PROGARD ULTRA (see Figure 10).

Valley Preparation

There are several types of valley construction: Open, Closed, or Woven.

A – Open Valleys:

First, lay a 46 cm (18”) wide strip of BP Slate Surface Roll Roofing with the mineral surface side down in the center of the valley, from the eaves to the top of the ridge. The sheet is pressed firmly into the valley and nailed 2.5 cm (1”) in from the exterior edges, using only enough nails to hold it firmly in place. Cut the bottom edge flush to the eaves of the roof. Apply 10 cm (4”) wide strips of Asphalt Plastic Cement to both sides of this strip. If a joint must be made, the upper section overlaps the lower by 30 cm (12”) and is cemented with Asphalt Plastic Cement. Next, center a 93 cm (36 3/4”) wide strip of BP Slate Surface Roll Roofing (of a color matching the finished roof if possible), surface side up, on top of the previous strip. Press firmly into the cement and nail in the same manner as for the first piece. Before applying shingles, snap two chalk lines into the full length of the valley, one on each side. Start the lines 10 cm (4”) on each side of the valley center at the ridge and open outwards at the rate of 1 cm/m (1/8 in/ft) as they approach the eaves, to a maximum of 20 cm (8”).

Non corroding metal could be used instead of BP Slate Surface Roll Roofing. Installing a layer of GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX, PROGARD ULTRA or MINI PROGARD Waterproofing Membrane in the valley, beneath the metal, will ensure maximum protection and prevent condensation.

When applying the shingles, lay them down to the edge of these chalk lines and cut to fit. Cut off the top corner of each end shingle at an angle, to prevent water from penetrating between the roofing courses. Cement the shingles at the chalk lines with a 7.6cm (3”) width of Asphalt Plastic Cement to seal them and nail down (see Figure 11).

Closed Valleys


Closed or woven valleys are preferred where slopes are steeper and where specifications call for valley protection using shingles. In these valleys, shingles on the adjacent slopes are butted or woven together.

In closed valleys, the valley is completely covered with shingles, but the shingle courses are not woven together. A single 91cm (36”) wide flashing strip of BP Slate Surface Roll Roofing, GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA is laid down the length of the valley before the shingles are applied. Then, snap a chalk line down each side of the valley 15cm (6”) from the valley joint. Run each course of shingles from the main roof across the valley and onto the adjoining roof for at least 30cm (12”). Nail the shingles to the roof, but keep all nails at least 2.5 cm (1”) outside the chalk line on each side of the valley. Bring all the shingle courses across from the main roof, before completing the courses on the adjoining roof.

Before installing shingles on the adjoining roof, snap a chalk line 5 cm (2”) from the valley joint on the adjoining roof. Run each course of shingles from the adjoining roof to the 5 cm (2”) chalk line and trim away the excess. Cut a diagonal piece off the upper corner of each shingle ending in the valley to provide better drainage. Nail the shingles to the roof, but keep all nails at least 2.5cm (1”) outside the chalk line. The ends of each shingle course are secured to the valley with a 7.6 cm (3”) wide strip of Asphalt Plastic Cement (see Figure 12). Installing a layer of GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA Waterproofing Membrane in the valley, instead of roll roofing will ensure maximum protection.

Woven Valleys

A woven valley is completely covered with shingles. Alternate shingle courses are laid across the valley and woven together. Because of the additional coverage provided by the shingles, it is not necessary to cover the valley joint with a double thickness of roll roofing. Only a single 91 cm (36”) wide strip of BP Slate Surface Roll Roofing, GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA is required. The flashing strip is laid over the underlayment.

In woven valleys, the roof shingles are first laid to a point approximately 91cm (36”) from the center of the valley on each roof slope. Snap a chalk line down each side of the valley 15cm (6”) from the valley joint. Run the first course of shingles (from the main roof) across the valley and onto the adjoining roof for at least 30cm (12”). Nail the shingles down, but keep all nails at least 2.5cm (1”) from the chalk line. Run the first course of shingles from the adjoining roof across the valley and on to the main roof for at least 30 cm (12”) and nail it in position. Remember to keep the nails at least 2.5cm (1”) outside the chalk line. Run the remaining shingle courses alternately back and forth across the valley, weaving the shingles together and nailing them in position as described above (see Figure 13).

Valley at dormer roof

Open valley flashings at a dormer roof are done in exactly the same manner as any open valley flashing except that the slate roofing is brought down over the first course of shingles of the main roof to the top of the cut outs and out on to the dormer roof. Do not install valley flashing until the shingle application reaches a point just above the lower end of the valley (see Figure 14).

Installing a layer of GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX, PROGARD ULTRA or MINI-PROGARD Waterproofing membrane in the valley, instead of Slate Surface roll, will ensure maximum protection.

Flashing


Vertical Wall Flashing
Soil Stack Flashing
Chimney Flashing

Flashing details shall follow Building Code requirements. As required, corrosion resistant metal drip and rake edge shall be installed at eaves and rake. Chimneys, vents, etc. should be flashed in an approved manner, using approved material such as galvanized steel or sheet copper.


Vertical Wall Flashing


Each piece of metal flashing must be provided with a 7.6 cm (3”) side lap. This dimension and the amount of the shingle exposure will determine the width of the metal flashing piece. For example, a 13cm (5”) shingle exposure will require a piece of metal flashing 20 cm (8”) wide, 13cm (5”) exposure plus a 7.6cm (3”) side lap. Each strip is placed on top of the shingle, with the lower edge just slightly above the cut outs or above the dragon teeth of laminated shingles.

Each metal flashing piece should be long enough to extend 10cm (4”) up the vertical wall, and 7.6cm (3”) onto the roof deck. For the above-mentioned example, taken together, the width and length dimensions require that each metal flashing piece measure 17.5 cm x 20cm (7’’x 8”).

To install step flashing, place the first flashing piece over the end of the starter strip and position is so that the tab of the end shingle in the first course covers it completely. Secure the horizontal flange to the roof with two nails. Do not nail flashing to the wall as settling of the roof could damage the seal.

Complete the first course of shingles along the roof eave, and secure the end of the last shingle to the metal flashing piece with Asphalt Plastic Cement. Do not nail through the shingle and metal flashing.

Apply the second metal flashing piece to the vertical wall sheathing and the roof deck using the same method described for the first one. Provide at least a 7.6 cm (3’’) side lap, but do not allow its edge to extend into the exposure for the first shingle course. On the roof deck, the metal flashing pieces must be completely hidden from view by the shingles (see Figure 15). Siding serves as cap flashing over step flashing on the vertical wall.

In re-roofing (application over an existing layer of shingles), ensure that the old shingles butting the wall are in good condition. Apply a strip of BP Smooth Surface Roll Roofing 20 cm (8”) wide over the shingles along the wall. Nail 10 cm (4”) apart along each edge of the strip. Cover with Asphalt Plastic Cement and embed the new shingles. Use a caulking gun and draw a bead of Asphalt Plastic Cement between the ends of the shingles and the siding.

Flashings should always be neatly done and color coordinated.


Soil Stack Flashing

Use either MINI-PROGARD, GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX, PROGARD ULTRA Waterproofing membrane, BP Smooth Surface Roll Roofing or a metal flange to flash a soil stack and lay around the soil stack before shingles are laid. Cut a piece of flashing material with a hole in it to fit just over the pipe and large enough to extend 10 cm (4”) below, 20 cm (8”) above and 15 cm (6”) to each side of the pipe. Slip this flange over the pipe and lay it fl at on the roof. Form a collar of Asphalt Plastic Cement around the pipe to plug the gap and work it in properly to obtain good adhesion of the cement to the pipe. Continue laying shingles and cement in all areas that overlap the flange (see Figure 16).

Flashings should always be neatly done and color coordinated.


Chimney Flashing


Chimneys are built on a separate foundation than the building to avoid uneven settling. This necessitates the construction of base flashings secured to the deck and covered by cap flashings secured to the chimney to permit movement, without damage to the water seal. Before flashing, shingles are applied up to the lower face of the chimney. A cricket or saddle is built on the upper side of the chimney to prevent the accumulation of water or ice.

Start on the low side of the chimney and apply a strip of BP Smooth or Slate Surface Roll Roofing, cutting the edges to permit folding up the sides of the chimney. Use MINI-PROGARD, GRIPGARD, GRIPGARD SX or PROGARD ULTRA Waterproofing Membrane as a super base for the flashing material. Extend 25 cm (10”) up the chimney and onto the roof to the top of the cut-outs of the last shingle course. Secure this strip to the shingles with Asphalt Plastic Cement.

Apply the metal base flashing, starting with the front of the chimney. Bend the base flashing so that the lower section extends at least 10cm (4”) over the shingles and the upper section extends at least 30cm (12”) up the vertical face of the chimney (see Figure 17). Secure the metal flashing to the roll roofing using Asphalt Plastic Cement. Shingle around and / or over the base flashing. 
 

Use metal step flashing for the sides of the chimney, positioning the units in the same manner as flashing a vertical wall. Cut, bend and apply the step flashing as shown in Figure 18 and as described in the Vertical Wall Flashing section. Secure each flashing unit to the deck with nails. Embed the end shingles in each course that overlaps the flashing in Asphalt Plastic Cement.

Next, cut and bend the metal base flashing to cover the cricket and extend onto the roof surface at least 15 cm (6”). It should also extend at least 15 cm (6”) up the brickwork and far enough laterally to lap the step flashing on the sides (see Figure 19). Shingle around and/or over the base flashing.

Cap flashings must now be placed over all base flashings for positive exclusion of water from the joint. Begin by setting the metal cap flashing into the brickwork as shown in Figure 20. This is done by raking out a mortar joint to a depth of 4 cm (1 1/2”) and inserting the bent edge of the flashing into the cleared joint. Refill the joint with mortar or Asphalt Plastic Cement. Finally, bend the flashing down to cover the base flashing and to lie snugly against the masonry. Don’t fasten through the base flashing, as the two must be allowed to move independently.

Use one continuous piece of cap flashing on the front of the chimney. On the sides and back of the chimney, use several pieces of similar-sized flashing, trimming each to fit the particular location of brick joint and roof pitch (see Figure 21). Start the side units at the lowest point and overlap each at least 7.6cm (3”). Remember that flashings should always be neatly done and color coordinated.

Flashings should always be neatly done and color coordinated.

 

 

  • LaSalle Plant

    9510, St. Patrick street
    LaSalle (Quebec), Canada
    H8R 1R9

  • Edmonton Plant 

    3703  - 101  avenue N.W.
    P.O. Box 576
    Edmonton (Alberta), Canada
    T5J 2K8

  • Pont-Rouge Plant 

    420, Dupont street
    Pont-Rouge (Quebec), Canada
    G3H 1S2

     

     

  • Joliette Plant

    351, Alice street
    Joliette (Quebec), Canada
    J6E 8P2